How To Sleep Like A King Outdoors

Whether you’re a seasoned outdoor lifestyle enthusiast or you’ve only just started to dip your toes into the endless ocean of opportunity that is the great outdoors we’ve all suffered at the hand of a poorly planned out sleeping area. Going to bed with a full bladder, not checking that the surface you’ve chosen to pitch is completely flat or tossing all order to the wind and heading out without a pillow; these are all common and easy to make mistakes.

So, are there a set of rules that will always guarantee a great nights sleep outdoors? How do the experts do it? Is sleeping comfortably outdoors something that is reserved soley for the likes of cinema, books and fairytales?

Yes, we assume practise makes perfect and no. Thanks to the genius’ over at Thermarest we can all now rest well outdoors. Say hello to their latest little lifesaver; The Sleeping Well Outdoors Infographic. Follow these simple rules and you’re pretty much guaranteed to be snug, as a bug in a rug, even in the Great Outdoors.

12 Essential Tips For Sleeping Well In The Outdoors

 

There you have it, 12 simple steps that you can take for an amazing nights sleep. As you can see Thermarest have the experience, passion and knowledge that drives them to create great products and offer us life saving tips. If you’d really like to sleep like a King outdoors, check out our full range of Thermarest Gear and utilise the clever tips in this useful infographic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tentsile Tree Tents – Because the World is not Flat

Here at Webtogs.com we are proud to now stock an exciting range of products from one of the biggest brands of the moment; Tentsile.

Conceived in 1993, Tentsile aim their products at those who want to experience more of the outdoors. They started with an idea; to create a portable tree house with three anchor points and a spider’s web like structure, fast forward a few years later add some hard work and learning curves and here they are. Rugged, versatile, innovative, unique; the list goes on. A stunning example of zero impact architectural design these tents thrive in almost any environment to offer a deeper connection with nature and a stunning view as well as protection from ground dwelling insects and predators. They boast the versatility and comfort of a hammock with all the security and protection of a ground tent.

Suspend and equalize your tent between three anchor points such as trees, boulders and other large objects. Then just enjoy the unique, close to nature and comfortable experience of these versatile tents without leaving a mark where you pitch. They produce high quality accessories to maximise your experience and that even you to increase the size of your tent and create a suspended communal living space. Rethink the way you connect with nature with Tentsile tree tents.

 

Tentsile Vista Tree TentTentsile Vista Tree Tent 2

Tentsile Vista Tree Tent
This versatile 3 person tent features the most open design of all of their tents allowing the most natural outdoor experience. This allows it to be accessed via the central hatch door or any of the sides, and although this is not ideal in heavy rain the corners of the fly sheet can be pegged outwards to add greater rain protection. It features a spacious triple hammock floor, a removable flysheet roof and a tear resistant insect mesh that can also be used as a dry shelf for storage. With a set up time of just 15 minutes this tent offers the ultimate close to nature experience.

Tentsile Connect Tree TentTentsile Connect Tree Tent 2

Tentsile Connect Tree Tent

The Connect is the lightest and cheapest tent in their range. It sleeps two people and features an outstanding easy to use design that allows you to pitch it easily even in tight spaces. All you need is three anchor points, usually large objects such as trees, and you’re ready to get close to nature. You could easily convert this into a three person tent by simply adding a hammock beneath and set up with other connect tree tents it is easy to create a large suspended super camp. It features a removable flysheet which can be pegged outwards for added rain protection, a lightweight yet rugged construction, four entry points, a full insect mesh top and a super quick set up time of just 10 minutes.

Tentsile Stingray Tree TentTentsile Stingray Tree Tent 2

 

Tentsile Stingray Tree Tent

The Stingray is arguably Tentsile’s most versatile three person tent. Easily converted into a six person communal living space with the addition of two triple hammocks it offers the ultimate outdoor experience. Similar to the Vista this premium quality tent features a 15 minute set up time but it is more rugged. It is accessed via the large front door or central hatch and can offer added rain protection when the removable rainfly is pegged outwards. Versatile, rugged and innovative combine several Vista’s and triple hammocks to create an exciting outdoor living space for a closer than ever experience to nature.

Tentsile Lightweight Webbing Ladders for Tree TentTentsile Lightweight Webbing Ladders for Tree Tent 2

Tentsile Lightweight Webbing Ladders for Tree Tent

The Tentsile Lightweight Webbing Ladders for Tree Tent is an essential accessory for gravity defying camping. If you’re looking for an even more unique and exciting camping experience or better protection from ground dwelling predators you’re going to want to set your tent up higher, and you’re going to need this lightweight and rugged ladder for easy access to your tent. Constructed from 25mm polyester webbing it weighs just 220g and comes with its own storage pouch. Simply click it into place with the two ‘quick link’ carabiners and you have a 6ft ladder for safer and easier access to your tree tent.

Tentsile Drinks Holder for Tree Tent

 

Tenstile Drinks Holder for Tree Tent

Constructed from the same rugged insect mesh used in their tents this drinks holder is a great accessory for camping. It fits in place of the central hatch door via Velcro tabs and can be easily fitted or removed. It’s perfect for safely storing drinks in your tent, you could even remove your rainfly and have a beer under the starlit sky with friends.

As you can see Tentsile have brought their A game to the outdoor market and sparked a unique new way to enjoy the outdoors. Could this be the reinvention of camping? To see the rest of their innovative and inspiring gear check out the rest of our Tentsile collection.

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The Grass is Greener Down the Road

So often I find myself wishing I was somewhere else. Or at least, that the someplace here (wherever that may be at that time) was just some little bit different….

Cycling in British Columbia

When I was in rainy Montana, I longed for the dry desert. After a month in the forests of British Columbia and I dreamed of barren lands. The cold, snowy passes of Utah and freezing nights in the high valleys of Nevada and I was looking forward to speeding south to warmer climes.

Freezing hands in the snow

While rushing along the busy interstate to Las Vegas, I pictured empty dirt tracks down the Baja peninsula, but when I got there, the corrugated paths and loose sand were not so fun afterall.

Las Vegas Strip

And now I’ve come south to a low land of sun, the sweltering heat and endless sweating find me once again looking forward to the interior highlands. Although I know that whem I get there I’ll be cursing the hills!

Dirt roads of Baja

Of course, all these places are great for a while. But familiarity breeds contempt and the road ahead always looks better. Perhaps that is what keeps me moving…

Fun cycling through the Red Canyon

I just occasionally have to remind myself to enjoy the here and now too, while it lasts. Because the here and now can only be had once and it’s a pretty darn good place to be, all things considered.

Cacti at sunset

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Nameless Strangers – The Good Samaritan

On the road we meet many people. Some we will forget. Others will remain in our memories forever.

Travellers’ stories of hospitality from strangers are not uncommon. But that doesn’t make them any less memorable.

These chance encounters are often over with in a flash, but they will remain in the memory forever.

Whether it’s the tall grey-haired fellow who stops his red pick-up to tell you there’s a really scenic off-road route that will also avoid the steep hill and.then goes on to explain how to reach it.

Or the larger than life, jovial old chap from the farm you stopped at ons search for water, who tells of good spot to camp and later turns up there in his truck with wood for a fire, diesel to get it started and a thermos of hot water, on a particularly cold night.

Or the talkative man who asks interestedly about our journey over coffee in McDonalds one morning and tells of how he has damaged his car when he hit an elk in the way into town. And then as he says goodbye and wishes us well drops a $20 note on our table saying he’s sure we could use it for a meal or more coffees.

I never had a chance to ask these people’s names. As quickly as they entered my day, they left again.

But why is it that so often we don’t even know their name?

It’s because the stranger expects nothing in return. A purely altruistic act. (Except perhaps to feel good, if you believe in the selfish gene.)

And good samaritans don’t have names.

Not heroes with a name for whom fame usually follows.

(now since I rarely learn these helpful strangers names, it’s even rarer that I get a photo. So instead, here are a couple of photos of the kind of  places where these unlikely encounters sometimes occur…)

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